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Bronco's Adventures

Coyotes Dogs and Leonbergers

The coyote (Canis latrans) is a close relative of the wolf (Canis lupus) and the dog (Canis lupus familiaris). Coyotes live in every US state except Hawaii. It is estimated that there are between one million and ten million coyotes. Coyotes kill a lot of cats and dogs as well as livestock including 135,000 sheep per year (see this link). A lot of coyotes roam the neighborhoods in Dallas. I see them all the time and I’ve had close encounters with them while walking the dogs. Recently a two-year-old in Dallas was injured by a coyote attack (see the video below).

This means that dog owners need to pay attention to the coyotes. Don’t leave small dogs and cats outside if you don’t have a fence that coyotes cannot get through. When walking small dogs, you may want to bring maze or bear spray with you. I admit, I don’t, but it is an option worth thinking about.

Photo of a coyote taken on our younger son’s class trip to Yellowstone. Very green grass with a coyote in the middle.
Photo of a coyote taken on our younger son’s class trip to Yellowstone
This is a photo showing the math teacher Frank Jordan in Yellowstone and Grand Teton in 2007. Grand Teton the background. If you want to see wildlife photos from the Yellowstone/Grand Teton class trip click on the image. I was there too. It is a website that I created a long time ago. The trip was led by the math teacher (Frank Jordan).
If you want to see wildlife photos from the Yellowstone/Grand Teton class trip click on the image. I was there too. It is a website that I created a long time ago. The trip was led by the math teacher (Frank Jordan).
This informational video was created by a local news organization after the coyote attack on the two-year-old boy. DFW stands for Dallas Forth Worth.

Below I am including an excerpt from my book about a close coyote encounter while walking the dogs.

Our neighborhood is generously populated with coyotes as well as rabbits. Bronco (our Leonberger) used to bark at them, so they never got close to us. I assume they were afraid of him, but they certainly weren’t afraid of Daisy (Pug) or Ryu (Japanese Chin).

One day I saw a coyote coming around the corner at the end of our street as I was walking Daisy and Ryu. He saw us and proceeded straight toward us without hesitation and with no sign of fear. He wasn’t running, but coyotes have long legs, and he was sort of trotting along and moving pretty fast. I wasn’t worried for myself—an adult human can easily handle a lone coyote. I was worried for Daisy and Ryu. I didn’t want them to be the coyote’s dinner.

As the coyote came closer, I stopped and stared at him. When he was around fifteen feet away, he stopped and stared back at me. Ryu and Daisy were staring at the coyote, too. I could see that they were frightened, but they didn’t bark.

Meanwhile, I was calculating how best I could fight the animal. It wasn’t practical to lift both dogs in my arms and try to fight at the same time. So I had to let the dogs stay on the ground.

Before I could strategize further, though, the coyote continued on his way and disappeared behind some houses farther down the road.

Coyotes are pretty common almost everywhere in the United States, so if you need another reason to avoid letting your cats and small dogs run loose, remind yourself of this story.

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Finally, if you would like to learn about more about my book and find out where to buy it, click here or here. You can also click the image below to buy it from Amazon.com.

This is an image showing the front cover of the book "The Life and Times of Le Bronco von der Löwenhöhle". Click on the image to go to the Amazon.com location for the book.
This is the front cover of the book “The Life and Times of Le Bronco von der Löwenhöhle”. Click on the image to go to the Amazon.com location for the book.

By thomasstigwikman

My name is Thomas Wikman. I am a software/robotics engineer with a background in physics, but I am currently retired. I took early retirement. I am a dog lover, and especially a Leonberger lover, a home brewer, craft beer enthusiast, an amateur astronomer, I’m learning French, and I am an avid reader. I live in Dallas, Texas, but I am originally from Sweden. I am married to Claudia, and we have three children Jacob, David and Rachel. My blog feature the crazy adventures of our Leonberger e Bronco von der Löwenhöhle as well as information on Leonbergers

12 replies on “Coyotes Dogs and Leonbergers”

I can’t believe the jogger woman was attacked. The coyotes in the last two places I lived were very skittish. I’m glad she survived. I hear the coyotes around here, about 1.5 hours west of you, but I’ve never seen one. I carry bear spray on my jogs, but not for coyotes, for wild boar.

Liked by 2 people

I may have mentioned this. Some years ago, our neighbors lost their dog to a coyote. They forgot their dog in the yard when they went to deliver their first child. We’ve found dog remains in our front yard. I don’t know who the owner was. I’m just glad they didn’t see their dog like that.

Because I’m generally up early, I’ve seen coyotes frequently. I stlck my nose in other people’s business when I see them walking a dog and let them know if I’ve seen a coyote—especially if they’re walking their dog off leash.

One Sunday morning during the pandemic, I went out to get the paper. It was very quiet—and I heard the howling. It was the first time I’d heard it at home. We hear (and see) them frequently camping, but that’s a different matter. Some people take their pets camping. I don’t because you just never know.

Carrying mace or bear spray when walking dogs isn’t a bad idea. I hope you never have to use it.

Liked by 2 people

I don’t think you told me before. What a story. That is so tragic. It’s a stark reminder not to leave small dogs in the yard if you don’t have a tall enough fence. I think you are being very nice warning people. The last thing you want is a coyote sprinting out and snatching your dog. They also may get a larger dog to chase them and then around the corner somewhere they have a few more coyote waiting to attack the dog.

Liked by 1 person

I didn’t realize you lived in Texas just an hour west of Fort Worth. Yeah Wild Boars are definitely very dangerous to people. Coyotes can rarely harm an adult but wild boars on the other hand…Those we don’t have in Dallas. We’ve hunted wild boars a couple of times but we did not get any.

Liked by 1 person

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